Research Reports

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1. Author (Year) Rina D. Kumar (2007)
  Title Students’ classroom participation for improved learning in an English language skills course: An action research report
  Abstract The University of the South Pacific (USP) has implemented a skill-development program designed to improve the academic performance of students. This paper looks specifically at ways of improving interactive teaching and learning in the English Language Skills (ELS) class, EL001, a skills-based course requiring active involvement of students in learning and practice. This interactivity is the dominant teaching method, and students are required to undergo a number of assessments, including written tests, assignments, discussions and participation. To compare and evaluate ways of improving interaction in the ELS classes, this research focuses on the students’ behavior in paired discussions. Their responses to questions posed by the instructors during the class discussions are evaluated. Three specific methods are adopted to determine the outcomes: the ‘one book referral strategy’, the ‘instructor monitor strategy’ and the ‘own book strategy’. The participants are 33 existing students from the Arts and Science Faculties at USP who are studying the EL001 English Language Skills course. Implementation of ‘one book referral strategy’ and the ‘instructor monitor strategy’ have proven to be most effective in an interactive learning environment.
  Source Centre for Research in International Education (CRIE), Research Paper Series. http://www.crie.org.nz/papers.htm

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2. Author (Year) Vincent Donche, Peter van Petegem and Liesje Coertjens (2008)
  Title The development of learning patterns throughout higher education
  Abstract Research on learning pattern development in higher education contexts is scarce. In this longitudinal study the development of learning patterns of professional bachelor students is analyzed. Participants in the study were 254 students enrolled in eight different study disciplines. Vermunts’ Inventory of Learning Styles was used to assess individual differences in learning conceptions and learning strategies. By examining intra-individual changes in learning patterns we expected to find developmental trends within learning patterns. Results show that meaning oriented learning increases over time and undirected learning decreases. Some learning patterns are however more subject to change than others. The development of learning patterns was found to be relative and dependent on the learning pattern which students have already mastered in the first-year of professional bachelor education.
  Source Retrieved on 29th July 2011 from http://www.academia.edu/2567936/The_development_of_learning_patterns_throughout_higher_education
  Remark A newer version of this paper can be located in Learning & Individual Differences. Jun 2010, Vol. 20 Issue 3, p256-259. 4p. But full text download is restricted.

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3. Author (Year) Gerard de Zeeuw (2005)
  Title The acquisition of high quality experience
  Abstract The search for knowledge has continued to expand to new domains since its start in the seventeenth century. Some of them have proved unusually resistant. Methods have had to proliferate to deal with the obstacles, for example in the social domain. There also have been ideological reactions. Surprisingly frequently, methods and activities that appear to be effective in dealing with such domains are classified as “preliminary” or are distinguished by a “point of view” that has yet to be transcended to achieve “true” knowledge. One such activity is the acquisition of high quality experience. It is argued in the paper that it does not deserve being treated as a poor relative. It has a history of its own and can point to many successes, for example in the development of new values and emotions. Its only drawback seems to be that the search for high quality experiences has tended to be heuristic, or if one wishes, artistic. This situation is changing, however. In the paper the differences between the acquisition of knowledge and that of high quality experience are delineated. It is argued that facilitation of the latter’s searches requires the development of interactions between entities that generate and structure experiences--i.e., of human collectives that stabilise sufficiently to execute a collective action in their environment. They are characterised by the use of coordinating languages.
  Source Journal of Research Practice, 1(1), 1-13 http://jrp.icaap.org/index.php/jrp/article/view/8/15